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#1 Spyder Rocket

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 03:50 PM

I am in the planning stages of becoming an expat in Thailand and would like to bounce a few of my ideas, fears, and concerns off you guys. I am open to an honest and frank critique of my thinking and plans. Be brutally honest if you want, because I would prefer thought provoking comments.

I am a member of an expat forum but I'm thinking I might get more of a blunt and honest critique here in regards to mongering and not going overboard with it.

Why do I want to leave my home country?

Primarily, I am tired and unfulfilled. Mid-life crisis? At 48 years old, most definitely. I have been divorced for a long time and my kid is grown and finished with college.

I was working a good paying job but unfulfilled and unhappy. I sold my house last year, quit my job and went back to school to finish my masters degree. Since I've been going to school, I'm happier than I have been in a long time, but I realized that I have no desire to return to work.

I have no emotional or strong family ties keeping me here and I think I can live off of my military pension and savings in Thailand. I'll talk more about finances later.

Why Thailand?

I have some knowledge of Thailand from vacationing there over the past 8 years. Yes, I know that vacationing and living full time in a foreign country are two different things. I started serious consideration of this last year and was able to come over for a 60 day stay in 2012, prior to that I've been there on two 30 day trips and a couple of shorter ones. I plan on doing another 60 to 90 days in 2014 as another scouting trip to see where I want to live.

My target date is June of 2015 as that will be when I turn 50 and meet the age requirement for a retirement visa.

There are some things about Thailand that concern me, but we will cover those later.

Finances:

I am currently drawing a military pension and I'll be able to surpass the financial requirements of a retirement visa with a monthly income of 74,000 baht. Plus, I have enough savings to supplement my monthly expenses if needed, but I'd like to live off of the 74,000 baht budget if possible. I think that is enough as long as I don't turn into a full blown mongering animal.

I have already set aside enough money to keep in a separate account that I will not touch and use as an escape fund should things turn sour. I plan on always keeping enough stashed away that will allow me to return home and set up life in the US again.

Plus, I plan on getting a TESOL certificate if I feel the need to work or get too bored, I can look at changing visa types and teaching English. I'd rather not work but it is an option and I am exploring a couple of other back up plans.

Clearly, the type of visa you are on determines your eligibility to work in Thailand and I'm exploring all my options. Right now the retirement visa seems the easiest to obtain and matches my desire to not work.

Health Insurance:

I am covered by my current policy for living overseas but I might want to buy supplemental coverage for catastrophic injury in Thailand. I need to do a little more research on this one.

Fears/Concerns:

Oddly enough one of my biggest concerns is selling off all my possessions to make the move. I already took the first step in down sizing last year when I sold my house and moved into a cheap apartment. I got rid of a bunch of crap already, but the thought of selling off the remainder of my furniture makes me a little uneasy. I suppose I could put it in storage but that is an expense I really don't want.

I have an option of giving some of my nicer pieces of furniture to my sister and I might be able to talk her into storing a couple of boxes of keepsakes and documents at her place. I also plan on giving my kid electronics and some things I'd want him to have.

I don't know why this is fucking with my mind; perhaps it represents a total commitment to leave my home country?

Fear/Concerns Thailand:

Biggest one is safety, but not from political instability, earthquakes or tsunamis.

My biggest concern with safety in Thailand is from traffic or stepping into an open storm drain.

Every city and town that I have been to in Thailand it is a fucking nightmare walking down what passes for a sidewalk there. The hazards for breaking a leg or worse are everywhere. Jagged rusty metal, low hanging live electric wires, and busted concrete blocks are everywhere. Step out into the street to avoid a sidewalk hazard and you've got a motorbike bearing down on you.

I never feel at ease walking about town and I feel like that will bug the shit out of me. I don't see how stinking drunk farangs survive walking down Beach Road in Pattaya. I have seen one get hurt badly falling off a high curb down there and witnessed the aftermath of a motorbike versus car collision.

As a matter of fact, I know I could not tolerate living in Pattaya because of the amount of shady farangs.

A lot of my fellow farangs that I have met in Pattaya seem like fugitives from the law. Sure, there are many normal folks, but I am suspicious and wary of almost anyone who strikes up a conversation with me.

I lived in a lot of big cities and I consider myself to posses a fair amount of street smarts. My "Spyder senses" are constantly alerting me to danger in Pattaya.

The creepy farang factor seems to be much less intense in Phuket and Chaing Mai.

Becoming a Creepy Farang:

I am a little concerned at the prospect of transforming into the kind of farang that currently freaks me out.

Yes, I do enjoy mongering to a certain degree and I've got to admit that I'm worried that I'll turn into a certified hedonistic full-time monger if I live in some place like Patong or Pattaya.

It will be nice to be close enough to visit those places for a romp but I don't want to live in the midst of them.

I want to be at least 30 minutes away from any of the major fleshpots. Plus, more bang for your baht when it comes to renting an apartment the further out you get from the tourist traps.

I'll probably try some place like Chalong on Phuket for awhile and then try out Koh Chang or maybe up North in Chang Mai for a while until I find a place that clicks with me.

Culture Shock:

I am less concerned with culture shock. When I am away from the red-light districts, I do enjoy many aspects of Thai culture. My biggest concern is not being able to read or speak Thai.

One of the ways I plan on combating boredom is to take Thai classes. I know that I'll never become fluent, but I do want to learn some Thai and how to read their alphabet to some extent.

I know I have rattled off a bunch of bad stuff, there are a lot of things I do like about Thailand.

I have a few back up plans and am also considering Malaysia and China, but I'd have to work in both those places.

There are a lot of other aspects of making the big leap to moving to Thailand, but this is a good starting point.

Looking forward to hearing any feedback you might have.

Thanks in advance!
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#2 boomdraw

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:10 AM

you know it all from your trips and your rich, your have no issue whatsoever but the fear of alcoholism looming in your future if your a drinker, that's it.

 

 

1. thais luv gossip and soi sauce, don't gossip and better u don't even care, just mind your business n enjoy it

2. don't consum thai products esp there alcohol's

3.  look at thais like u look at old women= they all follow briffaults law ''what have u done (given me for free lately) for me recently'' quite well, just the way they are and don't expect much more, u just gotta enjoy that there women are happy with 15-30 dollars,,,, it could be so much worse.

 

4. expect to be fully over it and bored after about 7-8 months on the ground full time mixed with the knowledge that its still ten times funner then back home, if u can enjoy some sense of real life over there youll be fine, but if your a drinker your fucked, its a death sentence, im a teetoller, the place holds no temptation for me in terms of me loosing my consciousness from drinking n paying for sex after meeting a girl moments ago, in the long run this behavior ruins lifes.

 

 

I fully hear you on ''how u feel uncomfy I pattaya'', I was there for one day, didn't go out at that night  but walked around all evening and left asap in the morning back for Phuket at that time, and even at that time I wouldn't hold hands with a bar girl on the beach in the day time in patong, I fear'd looking like a sex tourist with some hamster for rent. its a normal feeling to feel yucky in mongerville r and r areas, they are to be used a few times a month for partying when u live there full time, there is just to much day pussy to scoop up without wasting money or going through the same song n dance again like connect four or dacing to the same songs again n again n again like the kids do, don't feel bad about feeling gross in pattaya though, its like being in the Midwest of America say somewhere like ohio with a bunch of fat fucks perveing on youngins all day, with a ugly ocean and beach to escape to that is essentially loaded with farang sex tourist piss, now living just outside of the areas of the night is a pure delight, strategy in Thailand comes down to not wakeing up next to whore establisments while still existing around whores, its this simple, on a short trip u want them next to you, a long one u want them atleast ten-fifteen minutes away aka the town right next door.

 

if u go to Phuket check out staying in karon or kata or if u really want peace go to rawai which will take u 30 minutes to reach patong from.



#3 dixon cox

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 02:06 AM

Why Thailand?
I have some knowledge of Thailand from vacationing there over the past 8 years. Yes, I know that vacationing and living full time in a foreign country are two different things. I started serious consideration of this last year and was able to come over for a 60 day stay in 2012, prior to that I've been there on two 30 day trips and a couple of shorter ones. I plan on doing another 60 to 90 days in 2014 as another scouting trip to see where I want to live.

 
That is a long first post but it shows you are serious and considering all avenues. There is (should be) so many things to consider if you want to minimise future issues, but no plan is infallible. I'll try and give my input a piece at a time.

You are very similar to me in many respects, your plans and previous trips etc.. In my opinion the only way to answer many of the questions people commonly ask about 'moving or retiring to Thailand' can only be answered effectively by yourself. In other words, by doing it and building up to it, learning what your needs and expenses are, accommodation and monthly rates etc.. You already seem to be on the right track.

I did the same as you, holidaying for many years, weeks turned into months then multiple months. The year before I made the move I stayed between Cambodia and Thailand for 6 months before a final stint working back home to clear a few final debts and to prepare my house. I didn't sell it, I am currently renting it out. Two reasons for renting are that it is currently not the best time to sell, plus I didn't want to rush into disposing of my major assets. Burning too many bridges and all that.

I threw away, gave away and sold so many things which had become burdensome through my life back home, I don't miss any of them and in fact I struggle to remember what they were now. That act of disposal in itself was so liberating. One friend I have is an eBay fiend, so he took shitloads of stuff off me and will sell it over time. We split the proceeds 50/50 and periodically he emails to tell me and transfers my half.

I'd planned for quarter of a century to be in a position at 50 years of age to have choices in my life, at the beginning I'd barely heard of Thailand, let alone been. By the time my 50th birthday approached I knew I wanted to get out of England. I began my expat existence a month shy of my 50th birthday in May last year.

Thailand became an obvious choice for me for several reasons. I'd traveled extensively throughout the country and SE Asia 15 years ago over a period of 18 months, spending about 9 months total in the Kingdom. I married and since divorced a Thai lady who became a British citizen and I have far more friends in Thailand than I have back home, even though only a few actually live here.

I do frequent bars fairly regularly but live on the fringes of the nightlife, I can't see or hear a thing where I am. Going to bars for me is 90+% to socialise and meet friends and chat, not to partake of the hookers, although occasionally I do, naturally. Mongering is of low priority to me, drinking is only done when socialising and I enjoy my own company and time flies by when I'm alone. I don't own a bike as I'm 5 minutes walk from several baht bus routes.

I take some prescription medicines, they are all available at any pharmacy here in Pattaya without prescription.

 

Finances:
I am currently drawing a military pension and I'll be able to surpass the financial requirements of a retirement visa with a monthly income of 74,000 baht. Plus, I have enough savings to supplement my monthly expenses if needed, but I'd like to live off of the 74,000 baht budget if possible. I think that is enough as long as I don't turn into a full blown mongering animal.


I believe it is always wise to have some contingency funds set aside and an exit plan should the need arise. Your B74k is plenty enough to live on. Again, similar to myself. I never deny myself anything, food, sex, a night out or whatever. But staying long-term your desire for paid-sex does diminish over time and my libido suits my budget, yours may not.

It's not unusual for some guys to spend B50k every week on holiday, but they've spent months gagging for a Thai night out and have a TR to write, memories to make and bells to ring. Life as an expat is totally different, but none the less enjoyable. But living the dream it is not, it is living with added benefits, minus working (for me).

Visas. Although I could I choose not to apply for a retirement visa.
Firstly; a one year retirement visa at a time is an insult to any retiree, other countries do several years at a time. Plus I don't like dealing with Thai bureaucracy and dangling on the whim of some official is not something that appeals to me.
Secondly; the need to leave the country periodically is something I like. I enjoy my one month in Cambodia between my 90 day stretches in Thailand. The place I stay stores things for me in my absence so I can travel relatively light. Upon returning to Pattaya I feel more refreshed and ready again. Living here 365 days a year might drive me nuts.

Perhaps my primary reason for living here is because I have grown tired and weary of life back in the UK and the direction the country is sadly taking. The best way to deal with things like that is to vote with your feet. I often vote with my feet here in Pattaya too.
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#4 Spyder Rocket

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 09:08 AM

@dixon cox

Thanks for the input!

Speaking of personal transportation, I cringe at the thought of getting a motorbike. I plan on avoiding getting one if possible, but depending where I end up it might be a necessity at some point.

One thing Pattaya has going for it is the Baht Bus system. If you think about it, that method of mass transit is amazing; all those individual little trucks working autonomously, yet in concert with one another to move people around that loop. The last time I was there I found myself wondering if that system evolved or if there was some sort of intelligent design behind it. I might have been drinking too much when I came up with that. ;)

I've always avoided Pattaya during high season; do the Baht Buses get overwhelmed during high season?

Every time I have been to Pattaya it has been during July or August and I've noticed that on the weekends the population swells. I can only imagine how packed that place is during peak season.

I explored Nakula one afternoon as I had heard a few people say favorable things about renting in that area. I didn't really get a good impression of it, but I didn't inspect it closely enough to give it an honest evaluation.

Health Questions:

I've learned how to minimize coming down with gastrointestinal infections while in Thailand. I avoid uncooked vegetables as I think they are the primary source. Even if they are washed or rinsed, chances are if there is something in there that will give you infectious diarrhea, it can't be rinsed away. Only cooking kills bacteria.

My last trip I didn't get diarrhea once, but I did manage to come down with strep throat towards the end of my stay.

My question is, have you noticed yourself building an immunity to the local bugs or is it something that you still get hit with?

In regards to pharmacies, I used to only go to the Boots pharmacies because it was apparent that they had professional pharmacists on staff and I found them very knowledgable and helpful.

However, during my strep throat episode I was desperate and went to one of those mom & pop pharmacies. I was very surprised how much that little old lady knew. She made me run down my symptoms and even peaked inside my throat and gave me the right antibiotics.

What is your experience with that sort of thing?

#5 thailover57

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:37 AM

If I can jump in, I've had the trots twice. Once from a roadside rotisserie chicken. 11 hours of the trots and praying to the porcelain god. Local clinic on Buakow got me back cheaply. He then opened his own clinic and when needed I would visit (flu-like symptoms, etc.). But as low season approached (less customers), his prices increased - Thai logic. My latest health issue was pneumonia. Decided to go to the new hospital near Soi Diana. X-Ray, 3 doses on a nebulizer, antibiotics, and cough medicine. 1,200 baht. The clinic would have charged me at least double.

Your question of building immunity to stuff - I think I have built it in some respects to food, but find as high season rolls around I'm prone to lung issues, so I've learned to be pro-active and at the first sign of post-nasal drip start taking drugs to dry it up.

As for motorcycles, have only used the taxis twice because of no other option. Too far to walk and no baht buses. Scared to death both times. It's baht buses, walking or a taxi for me. Walking is dangerous enough as it is!
Old, cantankerous, and sorry if I piss you off - well, not really. Just enjoy!

#6 dixon cox

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:45 PM

4. expect to be fully over it and bored after about 7-8 months on the ground full time mixed with the knowledge that its still ten times funner then back home, if u can enjoy some sense of real life over there youll be fine, but if your a drinker your fucked, its a death sentence


I agree with boomdraw here, although the sexual thrills and excitement had already reduced for me long before I stayed here long-term. Over-exposure to anything or anywhere dilutes the effects over time. Alcohol can be your happy friend or your worst enemy, my brother was an alcoholic. I've always been someone who could take or leave drinking as it's primarily a social activity for me. This still means I get merry often, but never pissed where I find myself staggering home.

I always have a bottle of whisky in the room too, but never drink any if I'm not going out, it's used as a warm-up to get the party started, so to speak. If and when I do go out to meet friends or attend a party in Pattaya I tend to arrive fashionably late to reduce overall drinking (and spending) time. Budget and health should be long-term considerations, despite me being a heavy smoker (another reason I dislike the UK).

 

A lot of my fellow farangs that I have met in Pattaya seem like fugitives from the law. Sure, there are many normal folks, but I am suspicious and wary of almost anyone who strikes up a conversation with me.


I rarely, if ever, go drinking in non-ladyboy establishments and almost never during the day or early evening. So this type of individual you describe does exist but contact with them, for me, is a rare thing. By the time anyone reaches 50 years of age they should be a reasonable judge of character to know when to be brief, smile and walk away. The same strategy with any potential conflict too, just be pleasant and move on, unless a bin needs paying first. The last thing I need here is an enemy or to be looking over my shoulder, with either farang or Thais.

Pattaya is definitely a magnet for wasters, losers, low-lifes and twats. The important thing is to recognise them and move on when necessary. The majority of people I know are posters on any one of the main ladyboy fora and many I've known for years. I meet and make new friends regularly too, the forums and it's members do play quite a large social roll for me and I can surf on their holiday wave of enthusiasm from time to time when they visit.

During lower seasons it can be deathly quiet in terms of socialising, I enjoy those times. A decent internet connection is paramount for me, not only for surfing, fora and browsing etc., but to keep my large store of movies, TV series and documentaries up to date. A decent laptop with HDMI and a nice TV screen make the world of difference. I doubt I'd ever need to pay for a cable TV service.

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#7 jimbo34

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 02:38 PM

Spyder

 Firstly: good responses from boomdraw and (especially) Dixon Cox.

 

 It sounds like you're ready for the Big Move to me. And you won't feel fulfilled until you try it at the very least.

 

 Like you, and DC, i found being 50 was a pivotal moment. Tired of work - i had a restaurant, which can be really hard work - divorced (no kids luckily) and depressed at the thought of what the furure held for me in England.

 

 I got rid of all my worldly possessions bar a few things which i've stored in my sister's attic, and arrived in Thailand with a large suitcase wondering what i was going to do. Unlike you, i have only a small pension, so needed to supplement it with some income. Hence buying a bar. Your pension will provide you with enough to live daily life in some degree of comfort and probably enough for a bit of mongering when it suits you.

 Don't be worried about unloading your "stuff". Its only "stuff" after all. I had some large furniture which i couldn't sell or even give away before i left. I ended up taking an axe to them just so that i could take them to the local tip. Broke my heart at the time, but its only "stuff", and i soon got over it.

 

 Your thoughts about finding a suitable place to live are spot on. Try a few different places. Rent an apartment for 3 months at a time, until you find somewhere you wish to settle in for longer. I can't imagine living in the heart of Pattaya would be a good idea. I live on the outskirts of Patong which provides some peace and quiet away from the noisy nighttime activities at the bar. I still enjoy mixing with my customers, many of whom i consider to be friends, but am able to get away and enjoy my own company after a few hours. I'm still mad for mongering but more often than not, return home alone. Living too far away from the sexual promise wouldn't suit me. But your needs may be different. As you say, try living in a quiet part of Pattaya. If Pattaya annoys you, move on. Keep moving until you find somewhere that suits.

 

 I live by my the mantra of "trust nobody" who lives in Thailand. As a result i reckon i only have 2 people i mix with out of hours. Most expats are deadbeat losers and i can't be arsed with them. Anyway, i get enough socialising at the bar, so don't feel the need to seek out company out of hours.

 

 One thing i bought was a decent motorbike/scooter. Not a huge growling monster, but something that's reliable and easy to drive. I trust myself to be alert enough to avoid the incredible dangers on thai roads. So far i've done that succesfully but only you know if you think you're skilful enough. One (of the two friends) i have here recently sold his bike as he'd had a few scrapes, usually in the afternoons/evenings after a few beers, and now walks everywhere or takes motorbike taxis. Better to be a little out of pocket than dead!

 

 I've been lucky healthwise, although i had a bit of a scare with my prostate at the beginning of the year, and now monitor the count every 3 months just in case.

 It took me just over 2 years to build up an immunity to the local bugs. I found, even though i was mainly eating farang food, i still got the shits regularly. Probably off uncooked salads and fruit. Now i rarely get a problem, although i avoid eating street food off those unhygienic carts that throng the pavements everybloodywhere.

 

 Although Thailand, and in particular, Thai people, are immensely annoying at times, i still find myself grinning at my lifestyle compared to how i would be living back in England. I look at my friends back there and find myself shaking my head in pity at their existence.

 Although i don't want to die here, i still love the place and don't have a single regret about changing my life dramatically, at all.

 

 Do it.

 Its a big brave step, but do it. Don't die regretting you didn't give it a go.


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#8 Hard News

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 03:22 PM

You nearly had me in tears with that reply Jimbo

 

It`s a call I`m contemplating as well....20 days paid holiday in Thailand isn`t quite enough to satisfy the thirst !!

 

But unfortunately a well paid job back in farang land fuels it.    

 

Considering 6 months in Thailand and 6 months of work back home.

 

I suppose I just need the balls to jump in the deep end.........As you pointed out "don`t die with regrets" life is very short



#9 dixon cox

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:41 PM

Only cooking kills bacteria.

My last trip I didn't get diarrhea once, but I did manage to come down with strep throat towards the end of my stay.

My question is, have you noticed yourself building an immunity to the local bugs or is it something that you still get hit with?
What is your experience with that sort of thing?

If I can jump in, I've had the trots twice.

Your question of building immunity to stuff - I think I have built it in some respects to food, but find as high season rolls around I'm prone to lung issues, so I've learned to be pro-active and at the first sign of post-nasal drip start taking drugs to dry it up.

 
I'm sure our bodies build an immunity through more regular exposure to non-home bugs, but I still get the trots from time to time. But I don't mind a flush-out occasionally so long as it doesn't persist for more than 24 hours.

In fact I much prefer the soft Thai stool here than the solid hemorrhoid inducing hard stools of home. The diet is better here even though I do eat a reasonable amount of farang food. As much as the cooking and preparation should be of concern, so should the cleanliness of the utensils, bowls and plates. Many street side style restaurants do their washing-up in an ever cloudier bucket of mucky water.
 
It often makes me chuckle when I read about guys on holiday trying to figure out where the lack of hygiene occurred and where their diarrhea originated, thinking back to which restaurant they ate at. Forgetting, in their eagerness and excitement, that they sucked the cock and tongued the anus of a third world tranny prostitute the night before.
 
I've had a nagging dry cough and a phlegmy nose for about 3 weeks now which has been easing off of late. I recall around 3 weeks ago a non-Thai Asian coughing in a Family Mart without covering his mouth and remember at the time exhaling fully to blow it away and turning my face. Inconsiderate cunt. Like being stuck on an airplane or living in or near a tourist spot, people from far away all congregate and bring little bugs along with them from home. A new bug for your system to deal with.
 
One thing in Thailand (certainly Pattaya) is there's no shortage of pharmacies, plus several easy walk-in clinics.
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#10 jimbo34

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:59 PM

You nearly had me in tears with that reply Jimbo

 

It`s a call I`m contemplating as well....20 days paid holiday in Thailand isn`t quite enough to satisfy the thirst !!

 

But unfortunately a well paid job back in farang land fuels it.    

 

Considering 6 months in Thailand and 6 months of work back home.

 

I suppose I just need the balls to jump in the deep end.........As you pointed out "don`t die with regrets" life is very short

 

 Thanks Hard News.

 If you have the kind of work that will allow 6 months on/ 6 months off, you're a very lucky man, and should definitely "go for it".

 

 In my ideal world i would have 9 months here in Thailand, and 3 months back in the UK, during the summer.

 Actually, its something i'm seriously considering for next year. May/June/July in England when the weather is great, and summer sport's in full flow. Its also Low Season here and gets pretty desperate, so it would also relieve the bar of the burden of my salary.



#11 boomdraw

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 08:39 PM

jimbo's above ideal is what most long term farangs in Thailand crave= getting to the west atleast 2 months a year, usualy by two months you've had enough of western bullshit but recharged from Thailand and its warmth which after a while becomes a little to invasive with its noiseyness, thais do luv to be social n know everything about your business, its wonderful but need a break after you've been around it day in an day out, u get back to the west and nobody gives two shits and its refreshing, then it gets lonely n sterile n u miss thai warmth n social attitudes.

 

 

getting sick in Thailand happens when u eat pussy, ass n sperm, just facts. if u spit out that shit youll find your rarely getting any ills, a head cold in Thailand or what my friend changed the name of from a ''cold'' to a ''hot'' is usually imo from dirty water or ice or swapping spit, u can simply run tap water through your nose to clean out the snot and come down with a head cold for a few days, happened to me my first trip. I never sick off of street food or restaurant food though, and never forget garlic is your medicine and its pennies, u catch something u eat ten cloves, its most certainly better in a day but if u can just do the dirty with your lb or gg and not swallow public spunk youll be so much better off, u simple spit that shit on her floor if need be when shes on her back closed eye'd in bliss or looking at the ceiling faking u get that shit out of your mouth, sorry this is the cost of renting public cum dumps.

 

 

essentially moving to Thailand is so darn easy, first time I flew there alone I didn't even realize what I did until I checked into a room then I was like '' wow I just flew to Thailand alone'' I never thought about it again to be honest though n never felt lonely.

 

get on a plane, sleep upright n poorly while watching a few movies, exit plane and you've done it, then after its been a long while on the ground u can think like jimbo '' u pity the folks back home ', I myself don't pity them but pity those that only know back home as its just to boring to know only that once you've done Thailand for a while. and the pride of people back home I find sad, as I found that Thailand made me humble and sober'd me up about women not the opposite, u tend to find mates back home have the grandest illusions about girls, and jump through the most useless hoops for the least rewards, Thailand will get boring but u should find more peace then u ever though possible just the same.



#12 veveron

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 09:31 PM

Yeah, there are criminals and perverts in Pattaya, ain't it grand.  Most people live in their own world so I don't think it will be to hard to avoid if you really want to.  Example; last apr after a meeting that broke up late, I was walking with a decidedly non-hobbyist, we drifted away from the hotel a little, just about in front of that 7-11 on suk before nana waiting for his driver. He was genuinely shocked with the spill-out from around closing, "they let this kind of filth go on here?"  

Agreed on the raw vegetables, but watch the often lukewarm meat on those street carts. You can kill the bacteria by cooking but still get sick from, say, a chicken half that's been sitting in the sun all day with only the underside on ice.

The language has been the annoying issue personally. In Singapore, enough people speak English, but the last two years on and off here I don't like not knowing enough Thai, working on it, but it's a hard language to get right, for me anyway.


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